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BUSH TRIMMING & GROUND COVERING

The Importance of Pruning & Trimming

Too often, plant maintenance is overlooked. There are several benefits to well maintained landscaping besides aesthetic purposes. Sure your home’s exterior property will look much more presentable, but pruning and trimming also allow for proper plant growth, as well as helping to control insects and plant related diseases.

Pruning vs. Trimming

The terms pruning and trimming are often used interchangeably, but surprising to most, there is a difference between the two. When you are removing the dead, loose, or infected branches or stems from its respective plant, you are pruning. Trimming, on the other hand, occurs when you are cutting back overgrown plants. Below are some of the many benefits from pruning and trimming on a regular basis.

Pest & Insect Control

One of the first benefits of pruning and trimming outdoor trees and shrubs is that pests and insects are better managed. If the insects on your property are not controlled, there can be serious concern. Tent Worms are colonizing insects that build nests in your trees and eat the surrounding foliage. While the insects might not necessarily kill off the plant, they can spread diseases, weakening the plant and increasing the likelihood of falling branches. If the plants are too close to your home, the insects can make their way into your home or invite other unwanted pests to nest inside it.

Protection

A more obvious benefit of plant upkeep is the safety of your property. Dead and diseased branches create a major hazard to your home. Your family is also susceptible to the danger of falling branches. By properly pruning your plants, especially trees, you are ensuring that your property is safe. The siding of your home can also be damaged from branches rubbing against it from harsh winds. Vines and climbing plants should also be trimmed regularly. Depending on how closely they are located to your home’s siding, they can grow underneath the siding and pull it away from your home’s structure.

Proper Growth

Just like yourself, plants need proper maintenance for adequate growth. Pruning and trimming shrubbery improve the health and strength of a plant. Structurally pruning a young plant will benefit the plant the greatest in the long-run. It will require less corrective pruning as the plant matures and is more likely to have a healthier formation. If there is a loss in shape, the plant can weaken and not have the strength to support the entire plant. The last thing anyone wants to deal with is an issue that could have been prevented. By continually pruning and trimming trees and shrubs as needed, your home’s exterior will reap the most benefit. All plants require specific maintenance at different times throughout the year. It is extremely important to continually monitor your home’s landscape so that you can make any necessary actions as needed.

PINESTRAW We recommend an annual application of pine straw. However, if you're only using it for decorative purposes, you can apply it about twice a year to keep the landscape looking fresh. The main goal is to prevent weed growth and enhance the beauty of your yard with ground cover. To do this the application of pine straw needs to be at least 3 inches thick.

Rubber Mulch Its no secret that mulches suppress weed growth by blocking the necessary light most weed seeds need for germination and early growth. A sufficiently deep layer of rubber mulch, usually 2 inches or more, provides similar weed suppression capabilities as wood mulch with one large difference that properly installed rubber mulches rarely require replacement and can last for 10 years or longer. It's heavy enough that wind won't blow it away, which is a problem with some lighter natural mulches. The mulch doesn't break down or decompose. And rubber mulches have the added benefit of retaining moisture in the soil because they block evaporation and prevent soil from overheating. Moisture from rain or irrigation can make its way through the mulched area to soak into the soil beneath.

Wood Mulch 

Mulch's purpose is pretty basic: It acts as a barrier, keeping sunlight and some air away from the soil surface. Mulch serves several purposes. It will not just suppress weeds and slow moisture evaporation, but should also break down into the underlying soil gradually and thereby improve the soil's texture. Everyone asks how much mulch to apply and when to apply it. There are no right answers. It depends on several factors, including your soil, amount of rainfall, type of mulch, and how weedy the ground is. Here are some guidelines:

  • For most mulches and soils, start with a layer 3-4 inches deep. 

  • If the soil is dry, water it before applying mulch to pull weeds easier.

  • Apply mulch just about anytime, remembering that if you mulch early in the spring, the ground might be slow to warm. If you mulch only in the winter to prevent heaving, wait until the ground freezes. Mulch could delay freezing of the ground, causing roots to go dormant later than normal and possibly damaging them.

Pinestraw

We recommend an annual application of pine straw. However, if you're only using it for decorative purposes, you can apply it about twice a year to keep the landscape looking fresh. The main goal is to prevent weed growth and enhance the beauty of your yard with ground cover. To do this the application of pine straw needs to be at least 3 inches thick.

Rubber Mulch

Its no secret that mulches suppress weed growth by blocking the necessary light most weed seeds need for germination and early growth. A sufficiently deep layer of rubber mulch, usually 2 inches or more, provides similar weed suppression capabilities as wood mulch with one large difference that properly installed rubber mulches rarely require replacement and can last for 10 years or longer. It's heavy enough that wind won't blow it away, which is a problem with some lighter natural mulches. The mulch doesn't break down or decompose. And rubber mulches have the added benefit of retaining moisture in the soil because they block evaporation and prevent soil from overheating. Moisture from rain or irrigation can make its way through the mulched area to soak into the soil beneath